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Philosophy

The Fear of the Unknown

Bildschirmfoto 2018-07-27 um 10.43.02

I remember being afraid of open water. A lot. We would go on a boat with friends. Everybody would jump off and swim. I stay on the boat. Irrational fear. Fear of the unknown.

What do we do when are afraid of the unknown? We get to know it.

Last year I did a 6-week rescue diving course. 6 weeks with two dives every day. I got to know the ocean. The unknown became the known. There are many things to be afraid of in the ocean. But now I know how they behave, what it means, and I can better calculate risks. Before it was just naive, ignorant and irrational fear. Now it is educated respect. I am not afraid anymore. I actually enjoy the ocean now.

What do we do when are afraid of the unknown? We get to know it. Click To Tweet

 

 

This is a picture we took after catching some fish with the harpuna. We took a deep breath, dove down to 10-15m, scanned the area and then shot the fish. A very raw way of hunting for fish. Very beautiful art. The Balinese guy in the picture can dive down to 45m and stay down there for 1 minute in only one breath.

There are two types of fear. The fear of the known and the fear of the unknown. Most types of fear are of the second type. Fear of the unknown. The cure : getting out of our comfort zone and getting to know the unknown.Everytime we are afraid of something, we can ask ourselves : „Do we even know what it is about?“

Afraid of starting your own company? Afraid of playing on the big stage? Afraid of change? Afraid of strange/new people? Afraid of making it happen? Afraid of letting go? We are usually afraid of EVERYTHING we do not know. But we are usually afraid of it very little once we get to know it. FLOW and purpose happens on the border between comfort and discomfort, on the border between order and kaos.

May the FLOW be with you!

Gerrit Keferstein, MD

Gerrit Keferstein is a Medical Doctor specialised in Performance & Functional Medicine. He is most known for his work on the optimisation of recovery and adaptation in elite athletes.

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